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Book Review: The Wheel of Darkness December 17, 2007

Posted by battysgirl in Books, Reviews.
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The Wheel of Darkness

Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

Date: August 28, 2007—   $15.99—   Book

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Three and a half shining stars. (of a possible four, of course)

 

 

 

 

 

From Publishers Weekly
In the exciting eighth supernatural thriller from bestsellers Preston and Child (after 2006’s The Book of the Dead), FBI agent Aloysius Pendergast and his ward, Constance Greene, seek peace of mind at a remote Tibetan monastery, only to fall into yet another perilous, potentially earthshaking assignment. The monastery’s abbot asks them to recover a stolen relic, the cryptic Agozyen, which could, in the wrong hands, wipe out humanity. The pair follow the trail to a luxury cruise ship, where a series of brutal murders suggests the relic’s evil spirit might already have been invoked. Fans of earlier books focused on a thinly disguised American Museum of Natural History may find less at stake among the new cast of secondary characters, but the fate of Constance, who claims to have aborted the child of Pendergast’s villainous younger brother, remains a potent subplot. While not as frightening as others in the series, this entry still shows why the authors stand head and shoulders above their rivals in this subgenre. (Aug. 28)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Batty’s Girl
My neighbor and I have been eagerly awaiting the chance to get to read this latest installment of the fun Pendergast books.  When he got it from the library, he passed it my way as soon as he had finished it.  I’m glad he did, but I’m also glad it was a library book.

I’ve liked these books since Bob lent me the first one earlier this year.  I find Agent Pendergast to be a fun hero instead of the generic big tough guy.  Although this latest book was still quite interesting and Agent Pendergast was still fun, it lacked a certain little something the others has so I couldn’t with good conscience give this a full four stars.

If you’ve been reading these books, its still a wonderful read, just not quite as good as you’re used to.  If you’re new to the books, read the others first, you’ll need the history to enjoy this one.

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