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Night Terrors October 28, 2011

Posted by battysgirl in Being a Mom, Celeste, Friends & Family.
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So, now that you’ve gotten a glimpse into my 3:00 am routine with Celeste waking up screaming a few nights a week, I figured I’d discuss (and ask for help) the idea of night terrors the 3:00 AM post raised.

According to this site, “Night terrors are caused by over-arousal of the central nervous system (CNS) during sleep. This may happen because the CNS (which regulates sleep and waking brain activity) is still maturing.”  It goes on to say that a tendency toward night terrors could be inherited from the parents and that they are thought to be linked to children or are stressed, overtired or ill.  It has also been linked to taking new medications and sleeping in an environment away from home.

I would like to think that my two year old isn’t very stressed.  We’ve been trying to make the transition from only child to big sister a fun and special one, but maybe we’ve placed too much emphasis on the upcoming change and caused this… I steer away from this idea because a) she had night terrors before I was pregnant, and b) I just refuse to believe I could mess my child up that much J.  She does, however, refuse to nap and I’m wondering if I start to track if I’ll find a correlation between the days she doesn’t nap and the nights she wakes me up with a night terror.  The night I wrote about earlier this week I remember that she did not nap in school that day so the only day I can say I clearly know about this correlation does occur (but one night is nowhere near enough data to draw a conclusion).

As for the other two explanations the article gives for most kids’ night terrors, Celly takes no medication (other than a vitamin and occasionally an OTC allergy medicine) and she always sleeps in her own bed so the change in medication and sleeping away from home arguments are not valid in her case.

How many parents out there have had kids with night terrors this young?  According to the article, its most common in children between 4 and 8 and she’s not even three yet.  How do you deal with them?

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